*6_LangellePhotographs by Orin Langelle

The Opening Reception for Are Humans Disappearing by photographer Orin Langelle takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. on First Friday May 5th at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art in Buffalo at 148 Elmwood Avenue.  Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be available.  Exhibit closes May 26th.

The theme of the exhibit Roadmap to Extinction: Are Humans Disappearing? is the possibility of human extinction if serious steps are not taken.

It was first shown in 2009 in Copenhagen, Denmark during the annual UN Climate Convention. Its original theme was climate change and its threat to human kind.

These are not the usual photographs one associates with climate change: ice caps and glaciers melting or polar bears adrift.

Others viewers commented that the exhibit reflects our fleeting existence. The photos depict a progression of images moving in stages from recognizable human forms to figures almost completely unrecognizable.

Today the images continue to reveal that, in the age of Trump, we face an existential crisis in which humanity itself may well be rapidly disappearing.

The photographs in Roadmap to Extinction: Are Humans Disappearing? were shot in October 2008 in the Gothic Quarter of Barcelona, Spain. They were inspired by a International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) conference happening there where Shell Oil sponsored the climate justice pavilion. The photos reflect the sublime absurdity of the world’s dirtiest companies offering so called ‘solutions’ to social and ecological crises.

The photos also expose the reality that time and space are fleeting and we are on this planet for only a brief time, so we should use that time meaningfully.

After the Opening Reception the show is by appointment only. For an appointment, please call +1.716.931.5833.

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Peter Beard and Jackie Kennedy Onassis walk through crowd during the opening of The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise

MARCH 10, 2017 – The prominent online daily photo magazine L’Œil de la Photographie, of Paris and New York today published all of the photographs from Orin Langelle’s 2015 exhibit The End of the Game: The Last Word from Paradise – Revisited.

Langelle’s photos document photographer Peter Beard’s first one-person show at the International Center of Photography in Manhattan in 1977, including his 40th birthday party at Studio 54.

The photographs and accompanying article can be viewed in L’Œil de la Photographie
MARCH 10, 2017 – WRITTEN BY Anna Winand:

The End of the Game, Revisited English

Fin de partie – Dernier message du Paradis, Revisité French

About Langelle’s Exhibit:

Over four months Langelle photographed Beard and the people, many celebrities, that were part of Beard’s life prior to and during the exhibit’s installation and the subsequent opening, plus Beard’s 40th birthday party at Studio 54 in January of 1978.

Langelle’s photographs are of events surrounding Beard’s 1977’s The End of the Game. The ICP installation consisted of Beard’s photographs, elephant carcasses, burned diaries, taxidermy, African artifacts, books and personal memorabilia.

In the early 60s Beard worked at Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, during which time he photographed and documented (illegally) the demise of over 35,000 elephants and 5,000 Black Rhinos.

With the support of the Peter Beard Studio, ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery presented this exhibition to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Beard’s book, The End of the Game – The Last Word from Paradise.

Langelle’s exhibit can be viewed at ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art

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Buffalo, NY– On January 27, CEPA Gallery (Contemporary Photography & Visual Arts Center) opened the 2017 CEPA Gallery Members’ Exhibition. Photographers Natalie Dilenno and Orin Langelle received the 2017 Exhibition Awards.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno
CEPA Underground Gallery

Both Langelle and Dilenno will have a solo exhibit at the CEPA Gallery in 2018. CEPA Gallery’s 2017 Members’ Exhibition features the photography and photo-related work of some of Western New York’s most talented artists. The exhibit runs until March 4, 2017.

The juror was Maiko Tanaka, the new Executive Director at Squeaky Wheel Film and Media Arts Center.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle
CEPA Underground Gallery

Langelle is the Director of the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art and Langelle Photography in Buffalo, NY. Langelle also serves as the Strategic Communications Director of Global Justice Ecology Project.

Langelle Photography and the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art are part of Global Justice Ecology Project’s Social Justice Media Program.

Orin Langelle is a concerned photographer, who for four decades has been documenting social and environmental struggles.

Since 1972 Langelle has documented peoples’ resistance to war, corporate globalization, ecological destruction and human rights abuses. His first photographic assignment was to cover the protests against the Vietnam War at the 1972 Republican National Convention in Miami Beach. Langelle’s Exhibition Award photograph was from that first assignment (below).

 

Republican National Convention—Miami Beach, FL 1972. Wounded soldier from Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) in a wheelchair during protests against the RNC. Photo: Langelle

Republican National Convention—Miami Beach, FL 1972. Wounded soldier from Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) in a wheelchair during protests against the RNC. Photo: Langelle

Langelle says, “I approach my role as concerned photographer by not merely documenting the struggle for social and ecological justice, but by being an active part of it. This has enabled me to garner the trust of many of the subjects I have documented, allowing me access that would not have been possible otherwise. In this way, I have been able to expose the truth that is so often hidden by the powers of injustice.”

He continues, “My work is an historical look at social movements, struggle and everyday life.  It is designed to counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer—especially with regard to the history of social and ecological struggles. This is not merely a chronicling of history, but a call out to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a new history.  For there has been no time when such a call has been so badly needed.”

When asked about her Exhibit Award photo, Natalie DiIenno says, “I’ve been studying Yves Kline and appropriated that image because he influences my work so much.”

She continued, “I’ve been making blue artworks recently, so he’s been a major reference for the blue and his concepts that deal with the notion of the ‘void’. A whole. That image is just a more literal explanation of this idea than his blue paintings (and my blue abstract photographs).”

[Note]: Many in the art world consider Yves Klein the most influential, prominent, and controversial French artist to emerge in the 1950s. He is remembered above all for his use of a single color, the rich shade of ultramarine that he made his own: International Klein Blue. Klein (1928 – 1962) said, “The imagination is the vehicle of sensibility. Transported by the imagination, we attain life, life itself, which is absolute art.”


Photographs of Natalie DiIenno and Orin Langelle, courtesy CEPA Gallery.

The CEPA Gallery is located at 617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203. Viewing hours are Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

More about CEPA after the current exhibits:

Other Exhibits that Opened January 27 at CEPA

David Jaan: I See People

David-Jaan-Portfolio-Featured-Image

Lingxiang Wu: A Modern Flaneur’s Possession

Linxiang-Wu-Portfolio-Featured-Image

Exterior Views: The Richardson Olmsted Complex

Cepa_Gallery_Lavin_Thomas_Towers_DetailsandAbstractions_first_place-1

Located in Buffalo’s historic Market Arcade Complex, CEPA Gallery is a full-service contemporary photography and visual arts center with impact in both the local and national communities serving approximately 300,000 individuals annually.

With four galleries of changing exhibits and events, multimedia public art installations, arts education programs, and an open-access darkroom and digital photo lab, CEPA creates a vibrant presence in the heart of downtown Buffalo.

CEPA’s programs are made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Originally incorporated as the Center for Exploratory and Perceptual Art to serve as a community darkroom and exhibition space, CEPA Gallery was founded during the Alternative Space Movement in May 1974 by recent graduates of the University of Buffalo.

Throughout its history, CEPA has strived to reflect the creative priorities for working artists, while growing to accommodate the educational and social needs of Western New York’s diverse community. Over the years, CEPA has evolved into a nationally recognized arts center that is truly international in scope, but regional in spirit. It is now one of the oldest and largest not-for-profit photography-based arts centers in the United States.

CEPA remains dedicated to photography and the photo-related and electronic arts, and has developed its programs and opportunities to provide working artists, urban youth, and other individuals with the necessary programs and facilities for the production and reception of contemporary art.

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Buffalo, NY–CEPA Gallery (Contemporary Photography and Visual Arts Center) announced the 2017 CEPA Gallery Members’ Exhibition. This year’s exhibition opened on Friday, January 27, 2017. The exhibit runs until March 4, 2017.

CEPA Gallery’s 2017 Members’ Exhibition features the photography and photo-related work of some of Western New York’s most talented artists.

The juror was the new executive director at Squeaky Wheel Film and Media Arts Cenrter’s Maiko Tanaka.

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Natalie DiIenno
Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle Underground Gallery

2017 Exhibition Award winner Orin Langelle
Underground Gallery

Two photographers, Natalie Dilenno and Orin Langelle received the 2017 Exhibition Awards.

They will both have a solo exhibit at the CEPA Gallery in 2018.

Langelle is the Director of the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art and Langelle Photography in Buffalo, NY.



A full article will be coming soon.





Other Exhibits that Opened January 27

David Jaan: I See People

Lingxiang Wu: A Modern Flaneur’s Possession

Exterior Views: The Richardson Olmsted Complex

Big Orbit – A CEPA Gallery Project Space

In late 2013, Big Orbit Gallery and their programs officially merged with CEPA Gallery. This strategic initiative will safeguard the mission and history of Big Orbit, while ensuring the continued growth of the region’s only program dedicated to the art and artists of Western New York.

BIG ORBIT’S HISTORY

A REGIONAL ORGANIZATION WITH A NATIONAL AUDIENCE

Since its inception in 1991, Big Orbit Gallery has been an artist-run arts center dedicated to transcultural, multidisciplinary explorations of contemporary art issues, with its primary focus being the promotion of the art and artists of Western New York.

Through programming that ranges everything from painting and performance art to architectural installations and live sound sculpture, Big Orbit extends the legacy of artistic innovation historically associated with Buffalo, providing a basis for the creation of new boundary-pushing work. The gallery encourages the under-represented, emerging and established artists in the community through solo exhibition opportunities, and curated group exhibits promoting social awareness.

By embracing many artistic disciplines, including visual, performance, and media arts, Big Orbit takes great pride in establishing a creative dialogue between artists and community while raising awareness of the arts developing in Western New York.

TEN YEARS OF SPIN ON WESTERN NEW YORK ART

An Essay by Elizabeth Licata

There had been an art gallery at 30 Essex Street since the 1970s . . . [I]t played a small but significant role in the Buffalo art scene—with the usual peaks and valleys—until late 1990, when it simply ran out of steam.

In stepped artists Katrin Jurati and Alan Van Every, then renting studio space in the Essex Street Complex. Jurati and Van Every decided to take over . . . revitalizing a mission and identity that up until then had been loosely-defined. In effect, they not only brought the gallery back to life, they gave it a personality.

They called the gallery Big Orbit . . . the astrological metaphor suggested the connectivity of artists and art spaces, big and small, revolving in the same cultural sky.

By the end of their tenure as Big Orbit co-directors, Jurati and Van Every had completed the process for the gallery to become its own 501(c)(3) organization. And another pair of young artists was ready to step in.

Read the complete essay.

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Buffalo, NY–Just days before the Presidential election, photojournalist and ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art Director Orin Langelle will speak about his timely new exhibit If Voting Changed Things [1] during a First Friday artist’s talk at the Allentown gallery. The talk will take place at 7 p.m. on November 4th at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo. The event will include a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. including wine and hors d’oeuvres.

If Voting Changed Things documents protests at the Republican National Convention in Miami in 1972 as well as protests at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions in New York City and Boston in 2004. This exhibit was timed to coincide with this year’s contentious election, and explores avenues for political change open to the public that are outside of the electoral system.

“The current uprising in Standing Rock, where indigenous peoples are trying to stop a new oil pipeline set to cross indigenous territory, is using many forms of direct action to protect sacred lands,” said Anne Petermann, Executive Director of Global Justice Ecology Project. [2] She continued, “The tactics used in this uprising, from civil disobedience to blockades of construction equipment, provide a stark contrast to the focus on the election as the sole option for having a say in what our future looks like.”

According to photographer Orin Langelle, “This Presidential election surely qualifies as one of most bizarre and fraudulent bread and circus reality shows ever designed to distract attention from the very real perils we collectively face.” Langelle added, “Clearly it demonstrates the need for fundamental systemic change. In the eleven elections since I shot those first protest photos at the Republican National Convention in 1972, things have only gotten worse. But not just worse. Catastrophic. We stand on the abyss of runaway climate change and are in the midst of the Sixth Great Extinction. Institutional racism is even more ingrained–with Buffalo being one of the most segregated cities in the U.S.”

David Reilly, a professor at Niagara University recently reviewed the exhibit [3] and said, “If Voting Changed Things… marginalized groups wouldn’t be in the streets. The electoral process in America has produced and validated a government that has produced institutional racism, militarization within and from our society, mass incarceration, crippling debt, perpetual war, homelessness, a failed health care system, eroding and ineffective education, and environmental exploitation.”

The exhibit is on display until December 2nd at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art. [4]

Contact: Kip Doyle, Media Coordinator, +1.716.931.5833 (office), +1.716.867.4080 (mobile) <kip@globaljusticeecology.org>

Notes:

[1] If Voting Changed Things

[2] Global Justice Ecology Project

[3] Reilly reviewed the exhibit for CounterPunch’s Weekend Edition on October 28th Complete the Sentence: an Exploration of Orin Langelle’s “If Voting Changed Things…”  and The Public on November 2nd At Buen Vivir: “If Voting Changed Things”

[4] The ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art was founded with the mission to utilize art and photography to present an historical look at movements for change, struggle and everyday life. It is designed to counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer—especially with regard to the history of social and ecological movements and issues, and to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a better world.

The name of the gallery, ¡Buen Vivir!, is a concept stemming from Indigenous and other cultures of the Southern Americas. ¡Buen vivir! means life in harmony between humans, communities, and the Earth–where work is not a job to make others wealthier, but for a livelihood that is sustaining, fulfilling, and in tune with the common good. to utilize art and photography to present an historical look at movements for change, struggle and everyday life. It is designed to counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer—especially with regard to the history of social and ecological movements and issues, and to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a better world.

¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, +1.716.931.5833 buenvivirgallery.org

¡Buen Vivir! Gallery is part of the Social Justice Media Program of Global Justice Ecology Project

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Just days before the election:

First Friday, November 4th from 6-9 p.m. Artist’s Talk begins at 7 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be available.

¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art, 148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY.

Exhibit of historic photographs of protests at the 1972 Republican National Convention and the 2004 Democratic and Republican National Conventions. By Orin Langelle, photojournalist and Gallery Director.

elephant-ps-gje0058-r1-e008-copy

The Republican Party’s Elephant “mascot” pulling a coffin, walks with protesters past the entrance of the Republican National Convention in Miami Beach FL. (1972)  Photo: Langelle

The exhibit’s closing reception takes place on First Friday, December 2 from 6-9 p.m.

Opening Reception was held Friday, October 7th.

All photographs displayed in the exhibit If Voting Changed Things by Orin Langelle, Langelle Photography. Printed by Mark Russel, Buffalo Canvas, using archival paper and ink.

For more information please see:

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We are supporting our good friends at El Buen Amigo and LASC by purchasing this advertisement for their brochure. Last day to purchase an advert is Friday, October 28.

We are supporting our good friends at El Buen Amigo and LACA by attending the event and purchasing this advertisement for their brochure. Last day to purchase an advert is Friday, October 28.

Please support our friends and allies at El Buen AmigoLatin American Cultural Association on November 5, 2016 at 6:00 pm. The event is being held the at the Hamlin House, 432 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY.

All proceeds will support the Latin American Cultural Association. Tickets include dinner, non-alcoholic beverages and dessert plus a silent auction.

The theme of the event is “Amistad”, as LACA celebrates friends and supporters and all those we all have to look forward to in the years to come and would like to encourage a sense of friendship and comradery in the Buffalo area and in Latin America.

More Info: 716.885.6343 and to purchase tickets for this event or place an advertisement in their brochure.

The Latin American Cultural Association, is located at 114 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201

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The exhibit features photographs of protests at the 1972 Republican National Convention and the 2004 Democratic and Republican National Conventions

Just days before the election, Langelle will give an Artist’s Talk beginning at 7 p.m. at the Gallery on November 4th.  The event runs from 6-9 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be available.

Policeman surrounded by razor wire high above on platform looking down at the so-called "Free Speech Zone," re-dubbed by activists as the "protest pit" during the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston, MA.

Policeman surrounded by razor wire high above on platform looking down at the so-called “Free Speech Zone,” re-dubbed by activists as the “protest pit” during the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston, MA.

Buffalo, NY–The Opening Reception for If Voting Changed Things took place at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art in Buffalo’s Allentown on First Friday, October 7 from 6-9 p.m. The exhibit features historic photographs shot by photojournalist and Gallery Director Orin Langelle.

Photographs from the 1972 Republican National Convention illustrate the resistance against the Nixon Administration’s war in Vietnam and the gap between a radical youth movement and the establishment. The Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) played a major role in the demonstrations.

The photos from the Republican National Conventions in 2004 highlight the anger at the Bush Administration over the war in Iraq and the overall disempowerment for the many. Bush and company were using Ground Zero, the site of the September 11, 2001 NYC attack, to advance their pro-war agenda.

The protests at the Democratic National Convention in 2004, not only showed the suppression of free speech, but demonstrated what activists called “the hypocrisy of the political process” by confronting the Democratic contender for president, John Kerry. Kerry, a Vietnam Veteran, was a high profile member of the anti-war movement in the 1970s, but his 2004 election platform included increasing the number of troops in Iraq.

In her October 2016 preview of the exhibit in Buffalo Spree, Editor Elizabeth Licata quoted gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson about the 1972 protests, “There is no anti-war or even anti-establishment group in America with the psychic leverage of the VVAW.  Not even those decadent swine on the foredeck of the Wild Rose can ignore the dues Ron Kovic and his buddies have paid.  They are golems, come back to haunt us all…”

Langelle’s 1972 photos include many of these vets, including Kovic.

“In the eleven elections since I shot those first photos in 1972, things have only gotten worse. Institutional racism is more ingrained–with Buffalo being one of the most segregated cities in the US. We are in a war without end, climate change is intensifying and injustice is rampant. Does voting change anything? This year’s election is particularly telling, as this may be the first election in US history where both candidates are so disliked by so many.”  –  Photojournalist and Gallery Director Orin Langelle.

The exhibit was assembled to explore these themes as we approach the next Presidential election.

Additionally, Langelle will give an artist’s talk at the gallery on First Friday, November. 4 at 7 p.m. – just days before the election.

The exhibit’s closing reception takes place on First Friday, December. 2 from 6-9 p.m. The gallery is located at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo.

Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be available at each event.

All events are free and open to the public.

Interviews and high-resolution photos available upon request.

Contact: Orin Langelle, Gallery Director, +1.716.536.5669  <langellephoto@photolangelle.org>

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1Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP) is proud to present the following three documentaries for you to view and share. GJEP‘s Executive Director, Anne Petermann and Orin Langelle (Gallery Director) worked on two of the three films listed below which were shown at the ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery for Contemporary Art on Tuesday, Aug. 2 as part of the Buffalo Infringement Festival.

Film #1 – Lacandona: The Zapatistas and Rainforest of Chiapas, Mexico

While it has become quite trendy among politicians in the US to denounce global trade deals, especially NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement), this first film from 1996 documents the origins of the fight against NAFTA in the jungles of Chiapas, Mexico.  While 20 years old, the issues in this film are just as relevant today.

As this film shows, on January 1, 1994, the day NAFTA went into effect, an army of Indigenous Peoples, some using only wooden cut outs as guns, emerged from the jungles of Chiapas, Mexico to fight against this trade deal that the Zapatistas had condemned as “a death sentence for the Indigenous Peoples of Mexico.”

Today, as social movements around the world continue to resist unjust “free” trade agreements such as the TPP (TransPacific Partnership), the Zapatistas continue to be an inspiration.

For more details on this issue, please read “On the 20th Anniversary of the Zapatista Uprising

 

Film #2 – A Darker Shade of Green: REDD Alert and the Future of Forests

This film critically examines government and UN schemes to use forests in Mexico and Brazil to “offset” greenhouse gas emissions in the US and the impacts these schemes would have on communities in all three countries.

It was filmed in 2011 in the village of Amador Hernandez in the Lacandon Jungle of Chiapas, Mexico; as well as Acre, Brazil and Richmond California.  It is a film about the power of resistance by local communities and Indigenous Peoples against unjust false solutions to climate change.

You can also view a photo essay from Amador Hernandez here

 

Film #3 – Nochixtlan: Land of Brave People

This film documents ten years of resistance by teachers in Oaxaca against repressive policies put in place by the government to break the power of the teacher’s union and pave the way for privatization initiatives.

For more information on this issue, please read “A Oaxaca Teacher Explains why Educators in Mexico are Under Attack

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